Coffee Grounds

Coffee Grounds

I've no need to venture off the proverbial "grounds" for coffee. Over the years, I've accumulated every implement one could possibly need to make the most of one's bean grounds: A french press, a Chemex, a high-end espresso machine (which almost never works), a stovetop espresso maker (which, like a revolver, always works), and a pantry stocked with three superfluous, cheap Mr. Coffee machines, for days when I'm not interested in anything at all fancy. Sometimes, I feel bad about this situatio
Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content.

19 thoughts on “Coffee Grounds

  1. My condolences on the unceremonious exit from the local bar scene. Down here on the island you can’t walk into a Home Depot without it being packed. Locals despairing over the cost of lumber etc. Although new construction is tempered, existing homes are selling briskly. Within a range of course. Insofar as java is concerned I drink 3-4 cups a day. Thanks to Covid the bar scene is nonexistent.

  2. An espresso machine, two French presses, a kcup machine, a nespresso maker, a kenmore coffee maker, a tassimo and a mocha pot are all in my current collection. Still my life does not feel complete. How do you like the Chemex?

      1. The only thing I have found in the last 5 years that improves the coffee is to add a few grains of salt to the grounds (odd as that sounds) .

        Maybe I’ll try the Chemex- the quest continues.

        1. During my misspent youth I worked on a tugboat in the Chicago area. Being low man on the totem pole it was my job to make coffee for my shift/watch. When being shown the coffee making ropes, I was told to add a pinch of salt.

    1. I drank tea every AM for 25 years before my daughter gave me a really good grinder a couple of years ago. I got a french press I love and because I’m my grandfather’s GS and my father’s son I add 3-4T of milk and a tsp of dark chocolate to every cup of dark roast and tea is now just a memory.

  3. The downtown areas that were decimated 20 years ago on the East Coast were transformed into restaurants ,cafes and boutiques and plenty of nail salons. It was easy enough to see happening. Gone hardware, thrift stores and antique stores and small grocery. The Malls 20 years ago were hot retail. Malls are in trouble now. Cities are in trouble. People have home gyms,offices, and learned to cook. You could not find flour in April. Baking,WOW.
    Grind Sumatra(low-acid) to Turkish powder. 2 level tablespoons in large mug. Pour boiling water,stir wait 2 minutes.
    If you can find Balinese coffee,even better. No macinery required,careful when you get to the bottom.

  4. I must be living in the past. The Nespresso machines serves me well, compact, no mess, minimal cleaning. More seriously, what is a blind spot is that we can observe the destruction but we need to read Schumpeter and open our eyes to how things are changing which can be additive instead of brooding on the negatives. The species adapts, it evolves, Perhaps a dose of optimism about the future is in short supply and a recognition that there are new businesses borne out of the pandemic or adrenaline shots to existing ones. How is it for Robinhood?

  5. Frieling double walled french press- up front cost is pricey, but I have been using mine for 20plus years- never disappoints. I am lazy with Peets Major Dickasons. I like it strong!!

  6. Also, and this is relevant, Specialties Bakery had four (?) locations here in Seattle. I believe it is a San Francisco based company. They feature Peet’s coffee from back in the day ( before Peet’s was gobbled up by a multinational ). Had… as in ( to paraphrase ) , ” after thirty three years Specialties is closing its business. The loss of revenue due to the Covid 19 crisis has forced us out of business”. A note tacked to one of its locations. They had excellent chocolate chip walnut cookies. I will miss them.

Speak your mind

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

NEWSROOM crewneck & prints