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Why Cut Payroll Taxes When You Can Just Hand $100 Billion To The Wealthy?, Trump Wonders

"Many people like it".

"Many people like it".
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5 comments on “Why Cut Payroll Taxes When You Can Just Hand $100 Billion To The Wealthy?, Trump Wonders

  1. The funny thing is that after a 10 year bull market, portfolios are stuffed with taxable gains, and indexing capital gains taxes to inflation would likely trigger a bunch of selling.

  2. so much for the postcard

  3. Too Much 4U

    First off, you have to come to grips with how inflation is measured and understand the methodology used to acquire flawed nonsensical data. The Bureau of Labor Statistics & USDA among others, compile massive amounts of noise to create inflation data, which connects to CPI and spills into all sorts of fun stuff like cost-of-living adjustments ( COLA s) for Social Security benefits, etc., etc. Etc….

    Now a short blurb about how those agencies search for inflation metrics, using a wonderful service called Nielsen Homescan.

    “Panelists are hired to scan the barcodes of products they buy. They send this info to Nielsen to help build consumer data. The scanning is done with either a scanner provided by the company or via a smartphone app.

    Nielsen HomeScan Consumer panelists accumulate points for scanning items they buy. These points are exchanged for various rewards. You’ll learn more about the rewards system below – potential prizes, how long it takes to earn them, and more. Panelists are also entered into sweepstakes for additional rewards.”

    With that in mind, fast forward here: Redesign Options for the Consumer Expenditure Survey (2011)

    Comparisons between estimates based on CE and the Personal
    Consumption Expenditures (PCE) data from the National Accounts suggest
    deterioration in the quality of the CE data, especially over the past decade (e.g.,
    Slesnick 2001).

    The source of this increasing disparity between the two data
    sources is often attributed to measurement error. For example, persons
    interviewed by telephone for the CEI have higher family income, but have similar
    levels of expenditures as those interviewed in person (Safir and Goldenberg
    2008; McGrath 2005) suggesting differential underreporting as a function of
    mode. In the CED, empirical data indicate declines in reports of expenditures
    across the reporting period (Silberstein and Scott 1991) … etc…

    https://www.bls.gov/cex/redwrkshp_pap_abtsrbirecommend.pdf

    ==> Although that’s all somewhat abstract, defining inflation and how it is characterized, sets up a fine example as how the word cost can be defined, abused or characterized, in terms of how one might alter tax code. It’s bad enough that inflation and CPI are literally an insane long-running joke (do some homework if you have the time) but to use trump bankruptcy tactics to adjust tax code fits right into how America can be made into the greatest bunch of fools to ever have lived!

    “The most convincing argument against this redefinition of “cost” is that it could not legally be limited to capital gains: “the department would have to make decisions about what types of assets would be indexed and…it would essentially be picking winners and losers…. [C]harities and other entities could sue the Treasury Department if it tried to make the change.”

    https://thefederalist.com/2018/08/02/rule-executive-order-also-bad-trump/

  4. tinker toys

    This was also said, back when bush was tinkering with stuff:

    The most convincing argument against this redefinition of “cost” is that it could not legally be limited to capital gains: “the department would have to make decisions about what types of assets would be indexed and…it would essentially be picking winners and losers…. [C]harities and other entities could sue the Treasury Department if it tried to make the change.”

  5. An important point in defining the word cost, is to also define inflation and realize that the means used to collect consumer data is highly outdated and so flawed that t has to be the least talked about joke ever to be played on America — it’s sort of like a bureaucratic equivalent of 9/11 on steroids mixed with Fentanyl.

    You have to first come to Jesus and realize that the data behind inflation, is gathered by Nielsen Homescan, for Bureau of Labor and USDA, who all collectively pay people to scan their consumer purchases: “Join Nielsen Home Scan Consumer Panel and you can earn valuable points which are redeemable for electronics, household items, and more!” However, the biased, disconnected chaotic noise they gather is the core means to understand and identify inflation in America (and other countries).

    As a random example, the 2011, Redesign Options for the Consumer Expenditure Survey, stated, “Comparisons between estimates based on CE and the Personal
    Consumption Expenditures (PCE) data from the National Accounts suggest
    deterioration in the quality of the CE data, especially over the past decade (e.g.,
    Slesnick 2001).”

    The source of this increasing disparity between the two data
    sources is often attributed to measurement error.

    This is a very deep and dark rabbit hole to go down, but the point here, is that if trump and his mafia punks want to reinvent the word cost to use it for tax code distortion, to distort the indexing of inflation — then, it’s really a good idea to learn about the bigger picture related to this circus and understand why the clowns all need to be put in cages!

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