manafort mueller russia Trump

The Mueller Indictment: ‘As Opening Salvos Go, It’s A Doozy’

"The first big takeaway from this morning’s flurry of charging and plea documents with respect to Paul Manafort Jr., Richard Gates III, and George Papadopoulos is this"...

"The first big takeaway from this morning’s flurry of charging and plea documents with respect to Paul Manafort Jr., Richard Gates III, and George Papadopoulos is this"...
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3 comments on “The Mueller Indictment: ‘As Opening Salvos Go, It’s A Doozy’

  1. This is a great article — thanks!

  2. Political prosecution according to the this billionaire hedge fund manager of the year.

    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/international-news/politics/political-prosecutions-in-full-swing/

    Whatever, it has the potential to be very destructive for the already very shaky long-term outlook for the US economy. Morons committing economic suicide. We don’t care; we just make money off it… bye-bye USA.

    • He appears to have a lot in common with Manafort https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_A._Armstrong

      Criminal conviction[edit]
      In 1999, Japanese fraud investigators accused Armstrong of collecting money from Japanese investors, improperly commingling these funds with funds from other investors, and using the fresh money to cover losses he had incurred while trading.[9] US prosecutors called it a $3 billion Ponzi scheme.[10] Allegedly assisting Armstrong in his scheme was the Republic New York Corporation, which produced false account statements to reassure Armstrong’s investors. In 2001, the bank agreed to pay US$606 million as restitution for its part in the scandal.[10]
      Armstrong was indicted in 1999, and was ordered by Judge Richard Owen to turn over $15 million in gold bars and antiquities bought with the fund’s money; the list included bronze helmets and a bust of Julius Caesar.[11][12] Armstrong produced some of the items, but claimed the others were not in his possession; this led to several contempt of court charges.[13] Armstrong was jailed for seven years under contempt of court, until Armstrong reached a plea agreement with federal prosecutors.[14] Armstrong admitted to deceiving corporate investors and improperly commingling client funds in a case that prosecutors said resulted in commodities losses of more than $700 million.[15] Armstrong was then sentenced to five years in prison.[11] He was released from Federal custody on September 2, 2011, after serving a total of 11 years in jail.[16][17]

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