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‘Normal’

Maybe the White House should charge COVID-19 with "treason, sedition and insurrection".

Apple said it will close an additional 14 stores, all in Florida, as the company takes preemptive action amid an increasingly alarming spike in COVID-19 cases across a number of US states. That brings the total to 32. The company first announced plans to reclose some locations late last week, after it became apparent that the risk of a second wave in the US is real. All seven Houston stores were closed on Wednesday. News of the Florida closures came on a day when Texas governor Greg Abbott froze the state's reopening push and Houston exhausted its ICU capacity. California reported another 5,349 cases, the second-most ever for a day. Cases in Arizona rose 5.1%, twice the 7-day average rate. Read more: Texas Freezes Reopening Push As Houston Faces ‘Apocalyptic’ July 4th Nevertheless, equities in the US managed to climb after a choppy session defined by disconcerting headlines and wild balderdash out of Donald Trump's Twitter feed, where the president lashed out at Black Lives Matter, quoting an unnamed "leader" whose remarks Trump said are tantamount to "Treason, Sedition [and] Insurrection!" It would be funny -- but it's not. Although tech underperformed marginally into th
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13 comments on “‘Normal’

  1. 25% of the deaths from covid are in the 50-65 age group.
    That age group were ( note past tense) some of the bigger spenders into our economy. This demographic age group are staying home and will continue to stay home, at least I know that is what I am doing.

  2. Jeez, how can we worry about a second wave when the first one won’t go away? A very disorganized pandemic if you ask me.

  3. We’ll just keep that R-zero right around 1 and see how long we can ride out the first wave. As good as things are going now, maybe we can avoid a second wave by getting up to a plateau and just staying there for the next 12 to 18 months. Such a feat would be a first for a “developed” nation, of which the US still considers itself.

  4. I will never understand how anyone can read Trump’s twitter rants and still maintain the illusion that he is fit for office or demonstrates any leadership skills. Yet he is still viewed by many voters as the better choice for the economy and confronting China. It goes to show how much gut feel and tribalism overrule reality much like the discussions around the US government debt/deficits. I’m not saying we don’t all have blindspots, but in the case of Trump, it’s like his followers are out on the road trying to drive from inside a sensory deprivation tank.

    • Dayjob, to your point regarding Trump’s supporters… The only thing worse than a large group of small-minded bigots is a large group of emboldened and positively-reinforced small-minded bigots.

      #MAGAfukyeah

  5. Do you ever get the feeling that too large a percentage of our high school graduates can readily pass an illiteracy test?? A couple of generations like that and I can certainly see where a large group of bigots or idiots can be had. Trumps people??

  6. While there are likely many supporting Trump who are not too bright, it is facile to call all his supporters stupid. If you listen to Fox News for instance, you will find most believing in the stupidity of his opposition. Not a good idea to underestimate your opposition…its like calling the market “stupid” for not knowing there is a recession. A week or two ago someone on these boards pointed to Laguna Beach, CA as a home of the 1%. While most in Laguna are well off, most also work for a living. A little North in Newport Beach however there were a huge number of huge yachts covered in pro-Trump signs (it became a “thing”). The local government had to step in when fights kept breaking out. These are wealthy people, trust funders and business owners, who are perhaps not academics but aren’t stupid. I’m thinking Trump has tapped a populous combination of the feelings righteous indignation of the “disrespected” working white man by others, and the entitlement of the wealthy. These are the forces of which revolutions are made. Woe be to the 1% who doesn’t let some cash really “trickle down”, maintain a meaningful middle class, and at least a modicum of the myth of class mobility.

    • You raise a very important distinction. I do think it’s important to recognize the many different kinds of intelligence and not to underestimate the appeal of Trump (fool me once). A lot of smart and wealthy people couldn’t care less what Trump says as long as they are making more money in the short-term even if it harms the economy and economic mobility in the long-term. You’re also right about people feeling disrespected and Trump tapping into that regardless of whether there is a legitimate basis for whatever grievances they perceive.

      I suppose at the end of the day, politics isn’t much different than rooting for a sports team for a lot of people. It isn’t necessarily about the policy so much as it is “our team,” and of course, the ref is always screwing our team over.

      • Unfortunately, this election might come down to “dementia” or “stupidity”.
        Biden, to his credit, did come out and say that if he were President he would require masks to be worn in public. Seems so obvious.

        • I’d gladly take “dementia” (even if it’s exaggerated by his opponents) in this case especially since I have confidence in the people that Biden would have in his cabinet.

          Going back to the “screwing our team” mentality, I think the perfect encapsulation of that is the latest NYTimes/Siena poll that showed that half of white people over 50 in the battleground states think discrimination against whites is as big a problem as discrimination against minorities. I’m genuinely curious what examples of discrimination those folks have directly experienced or if it’s largely the typical “war on Christmas” reporting that makes them feel that way. Regardless, Trump is like the pitcher who throws spitballs and throws a hissy fit (think George Brett pine tar incident) when the ump calls him on it except Trump is the commissioner’s son and can get rid of the ump if he pleases.

  7. Regarding “dementia”, pullleease people! Joe Biden has a speech impediment, it doesn’t mean he has dementia! He has been a stammerer all his life and look where he is now. Google The King Speech and please watch it. We don’t discriminate against people in wheelchairs or with limps or that are blind so open your minds to trying to understand his disability.

  8. Nobody. The fact that some people may support Trump and have yachts and businesses doesn’t mean they’re smart in the sense that they realize what a threat he is to American Democracy. Specially his unrelenting attacks on the justice system. Or they may be like the farmers who supported Trump thinking he was going to help them after decades of promises left unfulfilled by the Democratic or Republican party then in power. I can’t think of a single reason anyone with any real education would think he isn’t a mistake for history to not repeat. And Mitch McConnell as the idiot who left him in office.

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